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Flesh and SpiritAn anthology of seventeenth-century women's writing$
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Rachel Adcock, Sara Read, and Anna Ziomek

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780719090233

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: January 2015

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9780719090233.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM MANCHESTER SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.manchester.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Manchester University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MSO for personal use.date: 26 September 2021

An anonymous gentlewoman

An anonymous gentlewoman

Chapter:
(p.174) 7 An anonymous gentlewoman
Source:
Flesh and Spirit
Author(s):

Rachel Adcock

Sara Read

Anna Ziomek

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9780719090233.003.0008

This chapter comprises an introduction to the anonymously authored deathbed testimony titled Conversion Exemplified (1663), followed by selected reading, and several edited extracts from the work itself (including an extract from the address to the reader written by the author's husband). The anonymous gentlewoman's testimony was evidently posthumously published in order to vindicate her religious beliefs believed scandalous by her relatives who were more given to episcopacy. Recorded visits by Puritan ministers Joseph Caryl and John Rowe help to establish her piety. She expresses concern for how she would appear after death (both physically and spiritually), a concern that was quite typical of the period, when a dying person could be judged on how they behaved in their last moments.

Keywords:   Deathbed testimony, Conversion, Episcopacy, Appearance, Illness, Joseph Caryl, John Rowe

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