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Radical childhoodsSchooling and the struggle for social change$
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Jessica Gerrard

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780719090219

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: September 2014

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9780719090219.001.0001

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Introduction

Introduction

radical education, past and present (p.3)

Chapter:
(p.2) 1 Introduction
Source:
Radical childhoods
Author(s):

Jessica Gerrard

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9780719090219.003.0001

This chapter considers the place of education in the struggle for social change. Taking inspiration from cultural and feminist historians, Gerrard argues for the need to explore beyond institutional histories of the state in order to understand the role of education in social change. Responding to contemporary policy paradigms that often represent working-class students as ‘failing and disaffected’ (a representation compounded by the politics of race), Gerrard suggests the need to examine the social history of educational agency and initiative. Taking this up, this chapter then introduces the two social histories of radical education that are the focus of this book: the Socialist Sunday School (est. 1892) and Black Saturday/Supplementary School (est. 1967) movements.

Keywords:   social change, working-class education, social history, radical education, educational agency

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