Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
From Republic to RestorationLegacies and Departures$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Janet Clare

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780719089688

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: September 2018

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9780719089688.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM MANCHESTER SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.manchester.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Manchester University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MSO for personal use.date: 19 September 2021

1660: Restoration and Revolution1

1660: Restoration and Revolution1

Chapter:
(p.23) Chapter 1 1660: Restoration and Revolution1
Source:
From Republic to Restoration
Author(s):

Blair Worden

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9780719089688.003.0002

The restoration of the monarchy in 1660, however much it may have owed to hatred of the Puritan Republic or to contingencies of events or to the political dexterity of leading actors, could not have been achieved peaceably without roots in public opinion and without the movement which gave voice to it: the campaign for a free parliament that swept through the nation in 1659-60. The movement produced the destruction of the Rump and the calling of the Convention, the assembly which recalled the king. It supplied a mechanism to overcome the otherwise insuperable animosity between the two leading parties opposed to the Republic, the royalists and the presbyterians. And it drew on impassioned sentiments about parliamentary liberties and electoral rights which had previously been used to anti-monarchical ends, but which in 1660 gave the return of the monarchy the authority of national sentiment.

Keywords:   parliament, royalists, Puritan Republic, Restoration, presbyterians, electoral rights, Rump, monarchy

Manchester Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.