Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Beyond the StateThe colonial medical service in British Africa$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Anna Greenwood

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780719089671

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: May 2016

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9780719089671.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM MANCHESTER SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.manchester.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Manchester University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MSO for personal use.date: 22 October 2019

The maintenance of hegemony

The maintenance of hegemony

the short history of Indian doctors in the Colonial Medical Service, British East Africa

Chapter:
(p.64) Chapter Four The maintenance of hegemony
Source:
Beyond the State
Author(s):

Anna Greenwood

Harshad Topiwala

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9780719089671.003.0004

Histories of the Colonial Medical Service have considered the European Medical Officers forming their elites and also the subsidiary auxiliary staff who provided supporting healthcare provision. No research has, however, taken account of the Indian ‘middle-men’ who were also relied upon in many parts of the African Empire to provide healthcare to local communities. These men, despite being of lesser rank in the colonial hierarchy, were qualified in western medicine and undertook duties identical to their European superiors. The policy of recruiting Indians abruptly stopped however in 1923. This chapter discusses why this happened and argues that part of the reason for the definite, if surreptitious, policy to squeeze Indians out of government medical positions was that it did not fit in with the public image the British government wanted to portray from the 1920s onwards. As such, the authors show that the Colonial Medical Service was not always the white organisation that most histories have assumed.

Keywords:   Indian doctors, Kenya, colonial medicine, colonial medical policy, race relations

Manchester Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.