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The English SystemQuarantine, immigration and the making of a Port Sanitary zone$
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Krista Maglen

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780719089657

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: September 2014

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9780719089657.001.0001

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‘Theoretical opinions…’

‘Theoretical opinions…’

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(p.60) 2 ‘Theoretical opinions…’
Source:
The English System
Author(s):

Krista Maglen

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9780719089657.003.0003

Co-operation and information sharing among maritime states, based on common concepts of disease transmission, was necessary to support the theoretical and practical foundations of the ‘English System.’ This chapter provides a fresh approach to analyses of the International Sanitary Conferences and to theories of contagion in the late nineteenth century. It focuses on the particular British approach to both in relation to the much maligned practice of quarantine and the promotion of the new ‘System,’ exploring how the British and Colonial Indian delegates at the conferences sought to extend the sanitary zone through important ‘arms of the sea’ such as the Suez Canal. In doing so, this chapter examines the interconnectedness of British ports with foreign and international priorities, exploring them as part of an entangled space of negotiation with the ‘outside’ world, rather than places marking simply the perimeter of the ‘inside’ and ‘domestic’ realm.

Keywords:   international sanitary conferences, quarantine, Suez Canal, bacteriology, Robert Koch, India

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