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An Anglican British worldThe Church of England and the expansion of the settler empire, c. 1790-1860$
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Joseph Hardwick

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780719087226

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: January 2015

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9780719087226.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM MANCHESTER SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.manchester.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Manchester University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MSO for personal use.date: 12 April 2021

Imperial ecclesiastical networks

Imperial ecclesiastical networks

Chapter:
(p.169) Chapter Five Imperial ecclesiastical networks
Source:
An Anglican British world
Author(s):

Joseph Hardwick

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9780719087226.003.0006

This chapter considers the varied networks that connected the overseas branches of the Church both with one another and with the Church back in Britain and Ireland. Most scholars of colonial Anglicanism have seen the 1850s as the dawn of a new era of Anglican communication and networking. Generally, however, scholars have been drawn to the connections that emerged between colonial, American and British bishops; less has been said about the multifarious connections that linked the clergy and laity who were lower down the ecclesiastical ladder. By attending to the array of personal, non-official and day-to-day exchanges that flowed between colonial Anglicans, this chapter helps us to see the colonial Church in a new light: not only was this a Church where ecclesiastical authority pressed lightly on clergy and laity; it was also—at points—a relatively open and fluid structure that allowed different kinds of Anglican to recruit clergy and raise money for church-building projects. Participative networks of this sought could, however, be flimsy, and they could be threatened by the arrival of authority figures such as bishops.

Keywords:   Networks, Communication, Exchange, Centres of authority

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