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A sense of placeRegional British television drama, 1956-82$
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Lez Cooke

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780719086786

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: May 2015

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9780719086786.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM MANCHESTER SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.manchester.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Manchester University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MSO for personal use.date: 18 April 2021

Conclusion

Conclusion

Chapter:
(p.178) Conclusion
Source:
A sense of place
Author(s):

Lez Cooke

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9780719086786.003.0006

The book concludes with an assessment of the different approaches taken to the production of regional television drama by Granada and BBC English Regions Drama in the period under consideration. It is argued that while the representation of regional culture and identity was an important part of Granada’s television production from 1956-82, providing representations of the region for both local and national audiences, this was only one part of the company’s remit within a federal, commercial broadcasting network. BBC English Regions Drama, on the other hand, was established in the 1970s specifically to produce ‘regional’ television drama for the BBC network, although the conceptualisation and realisation of ‘regional’ drama in the department’s work varied considerably within this remit. The second half of the conclusion considers the decline of regional broadcasting since the early 1980s, assessing the impact of the 1990 Broadcasting Act, the consolidation of the ITV network, the emergence of independent production companies which have, to some extent, revitalised regional drama, the preference among regional audiences for local representations, the BBC’s outsourcing of its drama production to regional production centres in Cardiff and Salford, and the new possibilities for regional drama afforded by digital television and the internet.

Keywords:   Regional television drama, Regional culture and identity, Regional decline, Independent production companies, Digital television, Internet

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