Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Struggles for a pastIrish and Afro-Caribbean histories in England, 1951-2000$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Kevin Myers

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780719084805

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: January 2016

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9780719084805.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM MANCHESTER SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.manchester.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Manchester University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MSO for personal use.date: 17 June 2021

Pluralism, politics and the uses of the past (1981–2000)

Pluralism, politics and the uses of the past (1981–2000)

Chapter:
(p.153) 3 Pluralism, politics and the uses of the past (1981–2000)
Source:
Struggles for a past
Author(s):

Kevin Myers

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9780719084805.003.0004

The third chapter, spanning the period 1981-2000, traces the ways in which newly available historical identities came to be applied in public. Municipal multiculturalism developed educational and cultural policies designed to promote multi-ethnic and pluralistic cities. Ethnic difference in the present was explained by the invention of ethnic pasts and experiences that were tacitly assumed to be the basis of enduring historical identities. The resulting ethnic minority histories, which were initially championed by municipal multicultural policy and later recruited to combat social exclusion, may have effectively challenged the dominant national narrative but they also entailed their own silences and simplicities. It is argued that acrimonious debates, around what constituted ‘indigenous culture’ or ‘authentic history’, demonstrated how the historical sensibility promoted by earlier scholar activists was disappearing. In the practice of cultural difference, and in the associated elevation of ethnic histories as the source of strong identities, history was becoming a celebration of those differences and identities partly imposed by a racist society.

Keywords:   Municipal multiculturalism, Ethnic absolutism, Inclusion, Therapeutic education, Historical consciousness

Manchester Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.