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Ageing selves and everyday life in the north of EnglandYears in the making$
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Cathrine Degnen

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780719083082

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: January 2014

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9780719083082.001.0001

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Endings, pasts and futures: temporal complexities and memory talk

Endings, pasts and futures: temporal complexities and memory talk

Chapter:
(p.56) 3 Endings, pasts and futures: temporal complexities and memory talk
Source:
Ageing selves and everyday life in the north of England
Author(s):

Degnen Cathrine

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9780719083082.003.0003

Chapter Three puts forward a two-fold argument about temporality: firstly, that experiences of time and the significance of time may shift as a person ages; secondly, that temporality becomes important in older age because of the uses it is put to against older people in conjunction with narrative. It argues that both narrativity and temporality in ‘disrupted form’ are used against older people to mark a supposed decline into a lesser form of adult selfhood. Temporality has a further level of significance that is explored in this chapter, namely how it is linked to place and to belonging via ‘memory talk’.

Keywords:   temporality, place, memory talk, experience, narrativity

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