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Odoevsky's Four Pathways into Modern FictionA Comparative Study$
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Neil Cornwell

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780719082092

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: July 2012

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9780719082092.001.0001

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Conclusion

Conclusion

Chapter:
(p.144) Conclusion
Source:
Odoevsky's Four Pathways into Modern Fiction
Author(s):

Neil Cornwell

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9780719082092.003.0006

This chapter looks briefly at some of the ‘pathways’ within, and to, a fairly recent prizewinning novel, published in 1995 and written by a Russian, Andreï Makine, who writes only in French and has been resident in France since 1987. A curiously bi-cultural novel, of a pseudo-autobiographical nature, Le Testament français contains at least traces of the pathways explored in the present study. It also includes, of course, striking features of its own, such as waves which stem from war literature, or from what people might designate the fiction of sadomasochism. Post-war provincial Soviet life doubles, and alternates, with the Paris of la belle époque and an aspiration to revel in and revive a fin de siècle style of French prose. In diverse ways, France links with Russia, as does Siberia with Cherbourg.

Keywords:   pseudo-autobiography, Andreï Makine, France, Le Testament français, war literature, sadomasochism

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