Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
George Fox and Early Quaker Culture$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Hilary Hinds

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780719081576

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: July 2012

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9780719081576.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM MANCHESTER SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.manchester.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Manchester University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MSO for personal use.date: 20 September 2021

‘Moved of the Lord’: the contingent itinerancy of early Friends

‘Moved of the Lord’: the contingent itinerancy of early Friends

Chapter:
(p.100) 5 ‘Moved of the Lord’: the contingent itinerancy of early Friends
Source:
George Fox and Early Quaker Culture
Author(s):

Hilary Hinds

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9780719081576.003.0006

This chapter turns to the Journal's structuring focus on Fox's journeys, and raises questions about the movement's commitment to an itinerant ministry and the ways in which, in Edward Burrough's words, ‘The worship of God in itself … is a walking with God’. While an itinerant Christian proselytising ministry was as old as the journeys of St Paul, there was none the less something unusual about the Quaker commitment to such a practice – unusual in that no other radical religious groups at the time made physical travail such a cornerstone of their modus Vivendi, but unusual too in that such restlessness sits strangely with a faith premised on the silent stillness of the meeting for worship. The chapter argues, however, that the itinerancy of Fox and other early Friends, as memorialised in the Journal, becomes itself a means of demonstrating the ceaseless presence of the indwelling Christ.

Keywords:   Journal, George Fox, journeys, Quaker ministry, itinerant ministry

Manchester Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.