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In the Wake of the Great RebellionRepublicanism, Agrarianism and Banditry in Ireland After 1798$
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James G. Patterson

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780719076930

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: July 2012

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9780719076930.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM MANCHESTER SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.manchester.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Manchester University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MSO for personal use.date: 31 March 2020

1801–1804

1801–1804

Chapter:
(p.71) 4 1801–1804
Source:
In the Wake of the Great Rebellion
Author(s):

James G. Patterson

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9780719076930.003.0005

This chapter describes the movement during 1801–1804. Despite the lull in active resistance brought about by the cessation of hostilities between Britain and France in 1802 much of Ulster continued to be disturbed partially by what the authorities typically referred to as riots. These affrays took the form of faction fights at fairs and markets between parties of Orangemen and groups that were commonly described as Freemasons. Contemporaries differed in their assessment of the causes of these fights and further disagreed over the question of the social, political and religious composition of the Masons. These so-called riots were particularly frequent in the Ahoghill area of west-central Antrim in the second half of 1802, where they were most often described as conflicts between yeomen and United Irishmen.

Keywords:   Freemasons, active resistance, Britain, France, Orangemen, Ahoghill, riots, religious composition

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