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Being BoysYouth, Leisure and Identity in the Inter-war Years$
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Melanie Tebbut

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780719066139

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: September 2012

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9780719066139.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM MANCHESTER SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.manchester.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Manchester University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MSO for personal use.date: 29 July 2021

Bodies and appearance

Bodies and appearance

Chapter:
(p.106) 3 Bodies and appearance
Source:
Being Boys
Author(s):

Melanie Tebbutt

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9780719066139.003.0004

Chapter 3 compares and contrasts anxieties and concerns which surrounded the clothed and unclothed male body. Male bodies had a powerful cultural resonance after the war, in rehabilitative initiatives and emerging consumer industries. By the 1930s, the physical power of the masses, from the Bolshevik Revolution to images of crowds at play, was informing a national iconography of controlled and disciplined youth, very visible in newsreel footage from the 1930s of the Scouts, BB, boys' clubs, and totalitarian youth movements in Germany and Italy. At an individual level, young men's physical sense of self was coming under the growing influence of visual forms and commercial leisure trends, bringing working-class young men into contact with new models of personal behaviour and social interaction which made many sensitive to style, fashion and appearance. This chapter examines how working-class young men mediated the feminised connotations of consumption in negotiating these new physical images and ways of performing masculinity.

Keywords:   Masculinity, Male bodies, Consumption, Leisure, Fashion, Iconography, Youth, Anxiety

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