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Islamic Charities and Islamic Humanism in Troubled Times$
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Jonathan Benthall

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781784993085

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9781784993085.001.0001

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Religious persecution and conflict in the twenty-first century

Religious persecution and conflict in the twenty-first century

Chapter:
(p.151) 11 Religious persecution and conflict in the twenty-first century
Source:
Islamic Charities and Islamic Humanism in Troubled Times
Author(s):

Jonathan Benthall

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9781784993085.003.0012

This Chapter evaluates the incidence of religious persecution and conflict in our own century, as quantified and tabulated by two social scientists, Brian J. Grim and Roger Finke – with special reference to the plight of Christians and other religious minorities (including Muslim minorities such as the Ahmadiyya) in a number of Muslim-majority countries. It first appeared in the Times Literary Supplement on 1 June 2012, under the heading “Repression by numbers”. Reservations are expressed about the value of vast global comparisons such as are presented by Grim and Finke, but it is argued that such an approach is defensible provided that one is alert to possible bias or misjudgements that can warp the whole enterprise. The plight of Christians and other religious minorities in several Muslim-majority countries has become still more urgent since the publication of this book, with the rise of Isis in the Middle East and Boko Haram in Nigeria. This Chapter also mentions the anthropologist Chris Hann’s critique of what he calls “religious humanrightsism”, i.e. the claim that all religious traditions deserve to be treated equally.

Keywords:   Grim, Brian J, Finke, Roger, Religious persecution, Times Literary Supplement, Hann, Chris

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