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Mistress of EverythingQueen Victoria in Indigenous Worlds$
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Sarah Carter and Maria Nugent

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781784991401

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: January 2017

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9781784991401.001.0001

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‘We rejoice to honour the Queen, for she is a good woman, who cares for the Māori race’: Loyalty and protest in Māori politics in nineteenth-century New Zealand

‘We rejoice to honour the Queen, for she is a good woman, who cares for the Māori race’: Loyalty and protest in Māori politics in nineteenth-century New Zealand

Chapter:
(p.54) Chapter Two ‘We rejoice to honour the Queen, for she is a good woman, who cares for the Māori race’: Loyalty and protest in Māori politics in nineteenth-century New Zealand
Source:
Mistress of Everything
Author(s):

Michael Belgrave

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9781784991401.003.0002

This chapter discusses this transformation Queen Victoria in Māori thought from the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840 to her death in 1901. It argues that she would remain throughout an ambiguous and ambivalent figure. For many Māori, she would be a distant guarantor of rights denied. Many tribes maintained an intense loyalty to the Queen, pledged their military support to suppress the supposedly rebellion of others. Some saw no inconsistency between fighting Imperial troops, maintaining loyalty to a Māori King, and accepting an overarching authority of the Queen. While yet others rejected the Queen every bit as much as they rejected the missionaries, the governor and constitutional control by a settler parliament. This chapter explores these complexities and contradictions.

Keywords:   Maori, Queen Victoria, loyalty, resistance, Maori King movement

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