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Mistress of EverythingQueen Victoria in Indigenous Worlds$
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Sarah Carter and Maria Nugent

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781784991401

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: January 2017

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9781784991401.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM MANCHESTER SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.manchester.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Manchester University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MSO for personal use (for details see http://www.manchester.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 28 April 2017

‘We have seen the son of Heaven/We have seen the Son of Our Queen’: African encounters with Prince Alfred on his royal tour, 1860

‘We have seen the son of Heaven/We have seen the Son of Our Queen’: African encounters with Prince Alfred on his royal tour, 1860

Chapter:
(p.25) Chapter One ‘We have seen the son of Heaven/We have seen the Son of Our Queen’: African encounters with Prince Alfred on his royal tour, 1860
Source:
Mistress of Everything
Author(s):

Hilary Sapire

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9781784991401.003.0001

This chapter describes the ceremonial encounters between Prince Alfred, youngest son of Queen Victoria and several African chiefs and leaders during his visit to the Cape Colony, Orange Free State and Natal in 1860. The first of a series of royal tours designed to solder the loyalty of Britain’s diverse colonies to the crown, and to cultivate an association between the British Royal House and indigenous monarchies, the physical presence of the son of the reigning monarch amongst her African subjects played a crucial role in making flesh the mythology of the ‘Great White Queen’ as protector, redeemer and source of rights and liberties of all peoples of the Empire. Taking place prior to the final phases of dispossession and colonisation, the chapter demonstrates the different ways in which chiefs such as Sandile of the amaNgqika Xhosa, Moshoeshoe of the BaSotho and Moroka of the Barolong; and Natal chiefs such as Ngoza and Zikhale responded to the symbolism and ceremonial stage provided by the tour. The chapter argues these encounters were deeply ambivalent, but that they were significant in the establishment of a tradition of ‘black loyalism’ with all its ambiguities and contradictions.

Keywords:   Nineteenth-century, monarchy, Queen Victoria, Cape, Natal, Free State, African, Sir George Grey, Prince Alfred, chiefs

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