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Judges, politics and the Irish Constitution$
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Laura Cahillane, James Gallen, and Tom Hickey

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9781526114556

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9781526114556.001.0001

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Speaking to power: mechanisms for judicial–executive dialogue

Speaking to power: mechanisms for judicial–executive dialogue

Chapter:
(p.153) 10 Speaking to power: mechanisms for judicial–executive dialogue
Source:
Judges, politics and the Irish Constitution
Author(s):

John O’Dowd

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9781526114556.003.0011

John O’Dowd’s chapter concentrates upon the relationship between the executive and judiciary, specifically the communication, or lack thereof, between these institutions. He refers to some recent controversial episodes where this lack of communication has been problematic and suggests looking to Canada for potential solutions. The chapter concludes that a judicial council is no panacea for the ills that can afflict the relationship between politicians and judges. Individual judges (and especially the Chief Justice and other court presidents) will retain a role in bringing the concerns of the judiciary to the executive’s attention and sometimes also to the attention of the public and this inevitably runs the risk of cutting across politicians’ own priorities and sensitivities.

Keywords:   Judicial power, judicial councils, comparative constitutional politics

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