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Irish Women'S Writing, 1878-1922Advancing the Cause of Liberty$
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Anna Pilz and Whitney Standlee

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780719097584

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: January 2017

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9780719097584.001.0001

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‘A bad master’: religion, Jacobitism, and the politics of representation in Lady Gregory’s The White Cockade

‘A bad master’: religion, Jacobitism, and the politics of representation in Lady Gregory’s The White Cockade

Chapter:
(p.137) 8 ‘A bad master’: religion, Jacobitism, and the politics of representation in Lady Gregory’s The White Cockade
Source:
Irish Women'S Writing, 1878-1922
Author(s):

Anna Pilz

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9780719097584.003.0009

This chapter focuses on Lady Gregory’s historical drama The White Cockade within the context of the fin-de-siècle revival of Jacobitism. With its historical focus on the Battle of the Boyne and its social, political and economic implications for both Catholic and Protestant Irish society, the play’s topic was a daring one for the Abbey’s theatre audience. In The White Cockade, Gregory brought to light the power of self-sacrificial rhetoric and, at the same time, challenged the popular concept of nationalist martyrology by presenting her audience with what is effectively a double ending that allowed for a flexibility in responses. Despite the potential divisiveness of the historical subject matter, the play’s engagement with fin-de-siècle Irish Jacobite thought chimed well with its audiences. The contemporary acceptance of Gregory’s criticism, in particular, pays tribute to her dramatic craft and complicates our understanding of the politics of representation in early twentieth-century Ireland.

Keywords:   Lady Augusta Gregory, The White Cockade, Abbey Theatre, Jacobitism

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