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Irish Women'S Writing, 1878-1922Advancing the Cause of Liberty$
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Anna Pilz and Whitney Standlee

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780719097584

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: January 2017

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9780719097584.001.0001

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‘Old wine in new bottles’?: Katharine Tynan, Lord Edward Fitzgerald, and George Wyndham

‘Old wine in new bottles’?: Katharine Tynan, Lord Edward Fitzgerald, and George Wyndham

Chapter:
(p.156) 9 ‘Old wine in new bottles’?: Katharine Tynan, Lord Edward Fitzgerald, and George Wyndham
Source:
Irish Women'S Writing, 1878-1922
Author(s):

Kieron Winterson

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9780719097584.003.0010

This chapter offers a reading of Katharine Tynan’s work across its full range, with a close mapping of the texts against the political questions of her day. In doing so, it suggests a conception of Irish liberty that remained fundamentally unchanged throughout her literary career. It is a body of writing that, if it is to be understood, must be read in the context of what may be termed the Irish long nineteenth century – a period that began not in 1789 with the French Revolution but in 1782 with ‘Grattan’s’ Parliament’, and which ended with the sequence of events (including the rise of Sinn Féin and its political corollary, the failure of Redmondite Home Rule) that had their genesis in the Easter Rising. And if Tynan’s political views appear to have leant now this way, now that, it may be that they demand to be understood as an expression not only of her own struggle to come to terms with the violent dynamics of Irish history in the period before (partial) independence, but the struggle of the Irish people to do so, too.

Keywords:   Katharine Tynan, Lord Edward Fitzgerald, 1798 Rebellion, George Wyndham, Charles Stewart Parnell, Migration

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