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British Rural Landscapes on Film$
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Paul Newland

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780719091575

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: January 2017

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9780719091575.001.0001

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Where the land meets the sea: liminality, identity and rural landscape in contemporary Scottish cinema

Where the land meets the sea: liminality, identity and rural landscape in contemporary Scottish cinema

Chapter:
(p.119) 7 Where the land meets the sea: liminality, identity and rural landscape in contemporary Scottish cinema
Source:
British Rural Landscapes on Film
Author(s):

Duncan Petrie

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9780719091575.003.0008

This chapter explores the intersection of the representation of place and the exploration of subjectivity and personal identity in three feature films, all of which are set on the coastline of rural East or North Scotland: Another Time, Another Place (Michael Radford, 1983), Blue Black Permanent (Margaret Tait, 1993), and The Winter Guest (Alan Rickman, 1997). Collectively these films provide a very different set of images of Scotland to either the romantic or threatening landscapes of films set in the highlands and islands from Edge of the World to Rob Roy, or the more prevalent urban spaces of Glasgow or Edinburgh that have been familiarised by the New Scottish Cinema. They also foreground either women or children as central protagonists, creating fresh ways of examining the tensions between fantasy and reality, rootedness and escape, tradition and modernity that avoid the over-investment in male experience and anxieties that characterise recent Scottish film. The films also reinforce a connection between Scottish cinema and traditions of European art cinema.

Keywords:   British, Rural, Landscape, New Scottish Cinema, Scottish Highlands, Scottish islands, Another Time, Another Place, The Winter Guest

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