Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Conflict, Peace and Mental HealthAddressing the Consequences of Conflict and Trauma in Northern Ireland$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

David Bolton

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780719090998

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9780719090998.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM MANCHESTER SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.manchester.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Manchester University Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MSO for personal use (for details see http://www.manchester.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 19 August 2018

The mental health impact of the Troubles, 2000–2015

The mental health impact of the Troubles, 2000–2015

Chapter:
(p.70) 5 The mental health impact of the Troubles, 2000–2015
Source:
Conflict, Peace and Mental Health
Author(s):

David Bolton

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9780719090998.003.0006

Following on from Chapter 4, this Chapter explores the development of the understanding of the impact of the violence in Northern Ireland from the period following the Belfast Agreement in April 1998, until 2015. The ceasefires and demilitarisation of the 1990’s and the development of politics in the late 1990’s and thereafter, coincided with increasing evidence that the violence had had a significant adverse impact on the mental health and related wellbeing, economic and social needs and circumstances of the population. The author explores why this might be so. He discusses how the cessation of violence, the challenge of shifting from conflict to peace time ways of thinking and behaving, the use of more appropriate methods of research and other factors, exposed a high level of mental health need linked to the Troubles - with one study suggesting Northern Ireland had the highest level of post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) across 30 or so identical international studies. One explanation is that the Troubles endured for over 30 years with high levels of exposure to violence and threat. The trans-generational impact of the Troubles is also discussed. The Chapter concludes with lengthy discussion on these themes and on the challenge of undertaking research in communities where violence is on-going.

Keywords:   Northern Ireland, The Troubles, Research, Mental health, PTSD, GHQ, Suicide, Trans-generational

Manchester Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.