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We are no longer in FranceCommunists in colonial Algeria$
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Allison Drew

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780719090240

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: January 2015

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9780719090240.001.0001

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Imagining Socialism and Communism in Algeria

Imagining Socialism and Communism in Algeria

Chapter:
(p.1) Introduction Imagining Socialism and Communism in Algeria
Source:
We are no longer in France
Author(s):

Allison Drew

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9780719090240.003.0001

Communists necessarily proclaimed internationalism, but first and foremost they had to come to terms with the societies in which they lived and worked. Assessing their national conditions and proposing solutions to national problems were prerequisites for building a socialist movement. They faced a fundamental tension, however, between the Comintern’s declared project of applying uniform policies across all of its national sections and the specificity of their own national conditions, which necessitated the application and adaptation of Marxist ideas to very diverse environments. The introduction traces the PCA’s tentative and tardy efforts to imagine the Algerian nation – albeit a reflection of the country’s complex class, national and geopolitical circumstances – which inevitably impeded its ability to attract Algerians.

Keywords:   Comintern, PCA, Class, Internationalism

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