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The African presenceRepresentations of Africa in the construction of Britishness$
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Graham Harrison

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780719088858

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: September 2013

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9780719088858.001.0001

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Africa campaigning in the framing: from abolition to Make Poverty History

Africa campaigning in the framing: from abolition to Make Poverty History

Chapter:
(p.58) 4 Africa campaigning in the framing: from abolition to Make Poverty History
Source:
The African presence
Author(s):

Graham Harrison

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9780719088858.003.0004

This chapter reviews the major Africa campaigns in Britain: the campaign to abolish slavery, It analyses each campaign as part of a campaign tradition. It does this by connecting the campaign’s efforts to represent Africa through frame analysis. More specifically, the chapter focuses on three forms of framing: diagnostic, prognostic, and motivational framing. The chapter highlights certain core practices of representation: the boycott, petitions, and the use of propaganda.

Keywords:   Framing, Diagnostic framing, Prognostic framing, Motivational framing, Abolitionism, Anti-Apartheid, Jubilee 2000, Make Poverty History

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