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An Anglican British worldThe Church of England and the expansion of the settler empire, c. 1790-1860$
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Joseph Hardwick

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780719087226

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: January 2015

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9780719087226.001.0001

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Conclusion

Conclusion

Chapter:
(p.239) Conclusion
Source:
An Anglican British world
Author(s):

Joseph Hardwick

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9780719087226.003.0008

The conclusion argues that the story of settler religion in the first half of the nineteenth century is in many ways the story of the tension between an evangelical lay voluntarism and a Church hierarchy that was trying to mould a series of self-governing and self-financing Churches into a coherent, disciplined and uniform Anglican Church. The conclusion also assesses where we should place the Church of England in existing narratives of colonial expansion. From some angles the colonial Church does look like a conservative institution that was aligned with the forces of loyalism and reaction; but from another perspective the Anglican Church appears as an institution that sat well with the forces of reform and voluntarism that was transforming the colonies of European settlement in the decades after 1830.

Keywords:   Loyalism, Conservatism, Reform, Voluntarism, Imperial histories

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