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Wales since 1939$
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Martin Johnes

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780719086663

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: January 2014

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9780719086663.001.0001

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‘Who's Happy?’ Social Change Since 1970

‘Who's Happy?’ Social Change Since 1970

Chapter:
(p.342) 12 ‘Who's Happy?’ Social Change Since 1970
Source:
Wales since 1939
Author(s):

Martin Johnes

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9780719086663.003.0013

Chapter twelve charts the social and cultural changes of the 1970s, ‘80s and ‘90s. In particular, it considers the shifts in gender, age and race relations towards increased attitudes of tolerance, the ongoing attractions of consumerism and the impact of technological advances. It argues that although women became more economically active there were significant limits to the gains they made during this period and even many women's attitudes towards gender roles remained remarkably stable. It also charts the emergence of a post-industrial society where communities were being redefined in the wake of the closure of the traditional industries that had made them in the first place. It argues that the social and cultural changes of this period were more profound than anything experienced in the supposed revolution of the sixties but also questions whether these changes made Welsh people anymore content.

Keywords:   Gender, Social change, Feminism, Consumerism, Post-industrial

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