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From Victory to VichyVeterans in Interwar France$
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Chris Millington

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780719085505

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: September 2012

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9780719085505.001.0001

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Building a combatants' republic: The campaign for state reform, 1934

Building a combatants' republic: The campaign for state reform, 1934

(p.83) 3 Building a combatants' republic: The campaign for state reform, 1934
From Victory to Vichy

Chris Millington

Manchester University Press

This chapter examines the veterans' campaign for state reform during February to July 1934. In April 1934, the veterans' associations delivered an ultimatum to the right-wing government: reform the state or the veterans would take the 'rudder of government'. This campaign underscored the changing priorities of the associations. The UNC ultimately expressed confidence in the conservative government of Gaston Doumergue, which it found more to its taste. However, the centre-left UF, which had always opposed reform, opposed the government and now moved closer an authoritarian state reform programme. This chapter shows that it was not only sections of the UNC that could oscillate between moderation and authoritarianism depending on political circumstance, but also more moderate sections of the veterans' movement such as the UF.

Keywords:   France, Veterans, Fascism, Reformism, Third Republic

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