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A familiar compound ghostAllusion and the Uncanny$
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Sarah Annes Brown

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780719085154

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: May 2013

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9780719085154.001.0001

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Reanimation: Orpheus and Pygmalion

Reanimation: Orpheus and Pygmalion

Chapter:
(p.112) 5 Reanimation: Orpheus and Pygmalion
Source:
A familiar compound ghost
Author(s):

Sarah Annes Brown

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9780719085154.003.0005

This chapter considers two episodes from Ovid's Metamorphoses, Orpheus and Eurydice, and an inset tale, that of Pygmalion, itself narrated by Orpheus. In later responses to these myths the reanimated statue and the revenant wife are both used to flag the text's status as an imitation or revival, which, in many cases, is not all that is being flagged. These stories are frequently associated with homoeroticism. The chapter argues that the uncanny allusion marker directs the reader to significant textual precursors, and reveals curious repetitions and points of contact which help illuminate the concealed theme.

Keywords:   Ovid's Metamorphoses, Orpheus, Pygmalion, reanimated statue, homoeroticism

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