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RoadworksMedieval Britain, medieval roads$
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Valerie Allen is Professor of English at John Jay College of Criminal Justice, CUNYRuth Evans is Professor of English at Saint Louis University

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780719085062

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: May 2016

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9780719085062.001.0001

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Sources for the English medieval road system

Sources for the English medieval road system

Chapter:
(p.33) 2 Sources for the English medieval road system
Source:
Roadworks
Author(s):

Paul Hindle

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9780719085062.003.0002

This chapter opens by noting the growth of towns and trade in England in the medieval period, which required a fully functioning transport system, of which roads must have been the backbone, supplemented by river and sea-borne trade. It then looks at the different sources available to attempt to describe the national medieval transport network. The first step is to see which Roman roads were still in use, and which later Anglo-Saxon and medieval roads had ‘made and maintained themselves’. Documentary evidence is limited and place-names need to be used with care. The best evidence lies in itineraries (notably those of the kings) and maps (principally the Gough Map). Archaeological evidence is also assessed.

Keywords:   medieval England, roads, itineraries, towns, trade, place-names, maps, archaeological evidence, navigable rivers

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