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Beyond text?Critical practices and sensory anthropology$
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Rupert Cox, Andrew Irving, and Christopher Wright

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780719085055

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: September 2016

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9780719085055.001.0001

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Sweetgrass: ‘Baaaaaaah. Bleeeeeeet’

Sweetgrass: ‘Baaaaaaah. Bleeeeeeet’

Chapter:
(p.148) 15. Sweetgrass: ‘Baaaaaaah. Bleeeeeeet’
Source:
Beyond text?
Author(s):

Lucien Castaing-Taylor

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9780719085055.003.0015

This interview with Lucien Castaing-Taylor, director of the Sensory Ethnography at Harvard University reflects on the film ‘Sweetgrass’ he made in 2009 about the last migration of sheep through Montana’s Absaroka-Beartooth mountain range. It is an unsentimental elegy at once to the American West and to the 10,000 years of uneasy accommodation between post-Paleolithic humans and animals. With its observational filmmaking style of long shots and minimal camera movements it offers a prescient example of observational filmmaking as ‘sensory ethnography’ that was initially roundly rejected by many anthropological film festivals before achieving artistic acclaim and theatrical releases in the United States, Canada, Latin America, France, Germany, and the United Kingdom.

Keywords:   Sensory Ethnography, Montana, Sheep, Observational film, Trans-human

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