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Love, Intimacy and PowerMarriage and Patriarchy in Scotland, 1650–1850$
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Katie Barclay

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780719084904

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: July 2012

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9780719084904.001.0001

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The negotiation of patriarchy: intimacy, friendship and duty

The negotiation of patriarchy: intimacy, friendship and duty

Chapter:
(p.125) 5 The negotiation of patriarchy: intimacy, friendship and duty
Source:
Love, Intimacy and Power
Author(s):

Katie Barclay

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9780719084904.003.0005

This chapter focuses on the changing ideas around the nature of the marital relationship, relating to obedience, duty, friendship and, finally, domesticity, to explore the practice of intimacy within marriage from the seventeenth to the nineteenth century. Intimacy within modern society is increasingly understood to be a mechanism for reducing inequalities of power within romantic relationships. As scholars argue, modern intimacy is about two individuals being able to interest and stimulate each other, enabling them to grow as people, with the recognition that they may not be able to fully meet the needs of each other. Moreover, intimacy in the modern imagination is meant to dissolve power that stands in the way of closeness and personal development, promoting the needs of the individual and thereby allowing them greater freedom of expression of those needs and of their desires. In many senses, it mirrors classical ideas of higher friendship based on equality, choice, complementarity, mutual esteem and the possibility of reciprocal education.

Keywords:   negotiation of patriarchy, modern intimacy, friendship and duty, romantic relationships

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