Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Integration and Social Cohesion in the Republic of Ireland$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Bryan Fanning

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780719084782

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: July 2012

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9780719084782.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM MANCHESTER SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.manchester.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Manchester University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MSO for personal use (for details see http://www.manchester.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 26 April 2018

Some immigrant lives

Some immigrant lives

Chapter:
(p.81) 5 Some immigrant lives
Source:
Integration and Social Cohesion in the Republic of Ireland
Author(s):

Bryan Fanning

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9780719084782.003.0005

This chapter examines the role of capabilities, social capital, and cultural capital as distinct layers of resources that might facilitate functional integration. It uses the term ‘functional integration’ to denote what migrant workers themselves might consider as viable lives in the host society as distinct from host-society integration goals. Many migrants might envisage a temporary sojourn in Ireland that allows them to build better lives for families at home, only to encounter damaging levels of exploitation, risk, and isolation. Many of the experiences considered in this chapter are those of migrants who have been trafficked into what the Migrant Rights Centre Ireland (MRCI) describes as bonded or indentured labour. The chapter discusses the role of supportive social ties as a bulwark against vulnerability in the labour market, focusing on the experiences of the Brazilian community in Gort, County Galway. It also looks at the attributes of some of the immigrants who have demonstrated considerable willingness to participate in Irish society. The case study draws on interviews with immigrant candidates who contested the 2009 local government elections.

Keywords:   Ireland, capabilities, social capital, cultural capital, functional integration, migrant workers, exploitation, indentured labour, immigrants, elections

Manchester Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.