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This EnglandEssays on the English Nation and Commonwealth in the Sixteenth Century$
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Patrick Collinson

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780719084423

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: July 2012

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9780719084423.001.0001

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Elizabeth I and the verdicts of history

Elizabeth I and the verdicts of history

Chapter:
(p.143) Chapter 5 Elizabeth I and the verdicts of history
Source:
This England
Author(s):

Patrick Collinson

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9780719084423.003.0006

This chapter asks: Where do we start with the many verdicts of history on such a monarch, such a woman, and where do we end? This chapter draws attention at the outset to Archbishop Matthew Parker's use of the word ‘chronicled’. Although the historical chronicle was a literary genre which saw a good deal of cutthroat competition in Tudor England, there was a notion that there ought to be only one more or less official and reliably authentic account of the recoverable past. Commentators on William Camden's Annales have often assumed that the book was a celebration of a great monarch, if only, it seems, because that must have been what the author intended. The discussion also considers where the idea of Elizabeth the Protestant paragon and national heroine came from.

Keywords:   Elizabethan history, Tudor England, Archbishop Matthew Parker, William Camden

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