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Precarious Childhood in Post-Independence Ireland$
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Moira J. Maguire

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780719080814

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: July 2012

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9780719080814.001.0001

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Legislating care and protection: the Carrigan Committee, the age of consent, and adoption

Legislating care and protection: the Carrigan Committee, the age of consent, and adoption

Chapter:
(p.113) 4 Legislating care and protection: the Carrigan Committee, the age of consent, and adoption
Source:
Precarious Childhood in Post-Independence Ireland
Author(s):

Moira Maguire

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9780719080814.003.0005

Events surrounding the Carrigan Committee and the presentation of its report suggest that the assumptions, beliefs and behaviors related to sexual morality in post-independence Ireland were complex. The Catholic hierarchy opposed adoption on several grounds, and no administration was willing to cross the church on this issue. Adoption by an American family under American adoption laws provided the only alternative to institutional life or an insecure informal adoption or fostering arrangement in Ireland. The adoption of legitimate children presented a challenge in the context of the government's conceptualization of ‘normal’ or appropriate family composition. The evolution of Ireland's adoption process up to 1952 reveals the yawning schism between the republican ideal to ‘cherish all the children of the nation equally,’ and the way the state dealt with children who for whatever reason could not be cared for and protected by their own biological parents.

Keywords:   adoption, Carrigan Committee, Catholic hierarchy, Ireland, legitimate children

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