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Impostures in Early Modern EnglandRepresentations and Perceptions of Fraudulent Identities$
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Tobias B. Hug

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780719079849

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: July 2012

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9780719079849.001.0001

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‘The unfortunate whose kingdom is not of this world’1 – political impostures

‘The unfortunate whose kingdom is not of this world’1 – political impostures

Chapter:
(p.87) Chapter 5 ‘The unfortunate whose kingdom is not of this world’1 – political impostures
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Impostures in Early Modern England
Author(s):

Tobias B. Hug

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9780719079849.003.0006

This chapter focuses on political impostors, or people who assumed the identity of a royal personage in order to achieve either a personal goal or that of a political faction, in early modern England. These people were either genuine members of the royal dynasty or ordinary men or women who claimed to be the real heir to the throne and therefore challenged the legitimacy of the current ruler. The former are often labelled as pretenders or claimants. The chapter discusses various circumstances of a vacuum of power, including political or succession crisis, which provided fertile ground for their claims.

Keywords:   political impostor, England, personal goal, political faction, pretenders, claimants, vacuum of power, political crisis, succession crisis

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