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Shakespeare and SpenserAttractive Opposites$
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J. B Lethbridge

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780719079627

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: July 2012

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9780719079627.001.0001

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Perdita, Pastorella, and the Romance of Literary Form: Shakespeare’s Counter-Spenserian Authorship

Perdita, Pastorella, and the Romance of Literary Form: Shakespeare’s Counter-Spenserian Authorship

Chapter:
(p.121) Perdita, Pastorella, and the Romance of Literary Form: Shakespeare’s Counter-Spenserian Authorship
Source:
Shakespeare and Spenser
Author(s):

Patrick Cheney

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9780719079627.003.0004

This chapter explores Shakespeare's counter-Spenserian authorship, emphasising the importance of re-thinking Shakespearean authorship, because most critics still see Shakespeare as a ‘man of the theatre’. It also examines one example of Shakespeare's counter-Spenserian authorship, and tries to recover Shakespeare's concern for literary authorship within the anonymity of the medium of theatre. The analysis presented in the chapter helps in questioning two well-known and interrelated views of Shakespeare's career.

Keywords:   counter-Spenserian authorship, Shakespearean authorship, literary authorship, theatrical medium, Shakespeare's career

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