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John Hume and the Revision of Irish Nationalism$
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P. J. McLoughlin

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780719079566

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: July 2012

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9780719079566.001.0001

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The two traditions

The two traditions

Chapter:
(p.65) 4 The two traditions
Source:
John Hume and the Revision of Irish Nationalism
Author(s):

P. J. McLoughlin

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9780719079566.003.0005

Within a month of the Sunningdale Agreement's demise, the Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP) released a policy statement which made clear that there would be no departure from the party's essential political programme. The post-Sunningdale period saw the SDLP hold to its immediate political aims; the party was still convinced of the essential rectitude of its programme. The SDLP appeared to confirm Ian McAllister's opinion that the party was trying to demonstrate an open-mindedness – a willingness to consider any agreement which allowed some form of power-sharing and an Irish dimension. It is noted that John Hume had reverted to the revisionist nationalism of his early political career. The SDLP called upon the British government to assume proper responsibility for Northern Ireland, to take decisive political action to bring about a just settlement and to show that it was prepared to face down the unionist veto over the implementation of such a settlement.

Keywords:   Sunningdale Agreement, SDLP, Ian McAllister, John Hume, British government, Northern Ireland, revisionist nationalism

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