Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Land questions in modern Ireland$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Fergus Campbell and Tony Varley

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780719078804

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: January 2015

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9780719078804.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM MANCHESTER SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.manchester.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Manchester University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MSO for personal use (for details see http://www.manchester.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 26 April 2018

The Irish land question in a wider context

The Irish land question in a wider context

Chapter:
(p.65) 3 The Irish land question in a wider context
Source:
Land questions in modern Ireland
Author(s):

Barbara L. Solow

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9780719078804.003.0003

This chapter presents Barbara Solow's reflections on The Land Question and the Irish Economy 1870-1903. The intellectual context in which the book came to be researched and written is outlined. Barbara Solow suggests that, notwithstanding considerable technological advances and the accumulation of new research in the meantime, the basic thesis of her book remains essentially correct. She does suggest, however, that if she were to rewrite the book today she would put the Irish story in a broader context, both conceptually and historically. Only after the book had appeared did it become apparent that it may be seen as a case study of Marx's theory of primitive accumulation. A case is made for the relevance of Jon S. Cohen and Martin L. Weitzman's account of what happens when common rights are converted to private property.

Keywords:   Barbara Solow, Irish land question, Marx's theory of primitive accumulation, The transformation from feudalism to capitalism, The conversion of common rights to private property

Manchester Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.