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More Work! Less Pay!'Rebellion and Repression in Italy, 1972-77$
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Phil Edwards

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780719078736

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: July 2012

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9780719078736.001.0001

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‘Repudiate all forms of intolerance’: how the movements were framed

‘Repudiate all forms of intolerance’: how the movements were framed

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(p.111) 5 ‘Repudiate all forms of intolerance’: how the movements were framed
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More Work! Less Pay!'
Author(s):

Phil Edwards

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9780719078736.003.0005

This chapter examines the Partito Comunista Italiano's (PCI) perception and presentation of the movements of the second cycle of contention in Italy from 1972 to 1977. It analyses the key framing strategies employed by the PCI's daily paper l'Unità in relation to the key movements of the second cycle. It discusses the party's description of radical groups as adventurists, the youth movement as disorganised lumpenproletariat, and the armed groups as provocateur. This chapter suggests the weight given to these different framings corresponds to the different stages of the PCI's interaction with the movements.

Keywords:   PCI, cycle of contention, Italy, l'Unità, radical groups, adventurists, youth movement, disorganised lumpenproletariat, armed groups, provocateur

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