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War and WelfareBritish POW Families, 1939–45$
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Barbara Hately-Broad

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780719078545

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: July 2012

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9780719078545.001.0001

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Conclusions

Conclusions

Chapter:
(p.243) Conclusions
Source:
War and Welfare
Author(s):

Barbara Hately-Broad

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9780719078545.003.0009

This chapter provides answers to the questions of the development of British welfare policy for service families and prisoner-of-war families during the Second World War, explaining how government agencies ignored the experiences of the First World War in relation to both service allowances and prisoner of war matters. Further, it elaborates on the fact that both the War Office and Treasury ignored the possible effects of mass conscription. No action was taken in the aftermath of the First World War to ensure better provision for the families of those taken captive, resulting in the failure to frame a long-term policy or adequate channel of communication through which prisoner-of-war families could make enquiries and seek advice. The chapter concludes by stating that no changes were made in order to promote the services as an attractive career option.

Keywords:   British welfare policy, service families, prisoner of war, First World War, service allowances

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