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British Asian FictionTwenty-first Century Voices$
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Sara Upstone

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780719078323

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: July 2012

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9780719078323.001.0001

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Introduction

Introduction

Chapter:
(p.1) Introduction
Source:
British Asian Fiction
Author(s):

Sara Upstone

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9780719078323.003.0001

There have been Asian writers in Britain for almost as long as there have been Asians in Britain: since the seventeenth century. In the wake of mass migration from the 1950s, however, for the first time there exist in large numbers Asians born in Britain or settled since childhood, and now, as a result, British-born or British-raised Asian authors. This book focuses on the works of fiction produced by British Asians. Its central contention is that British Asian authors, who have emerged only in notable numbers in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries, mark the establishment of a definitive genre of British Asian literature deserving recognition in its own right. Throughout the book, the term ‘British-born/raised’ is employed in preference to the terms ‘second generation’ (for those born in Britain) or ‘1.5 generation’ (for those raised in Britain). The book examines the writings of Salman Rushdie and V. S. Naipaul, Hanif Kureishi, Ravinder Randhawa, Atima Srivastava, Nadeem Aslam, Meera Syal, Hari Kunzru, Monica Ali and Suhayl Saadi.

Keywords:   British Asians, Britain, fiction, British Asian literature, second generation, 1.5 generation, Salman Rushdie, British Asian authors, Hari Kunzru, Monica Ali

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