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Beyond RepresentationTelevision Drama and the Politics and Aesthetics of Identity$
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Geraldine Harris

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780719074585

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: July 2012

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9780719074585.001.0001

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Beyond realism? Modes of reading in Marxist-socialist and post-Marxist-socialist Television drama criticism

Beyond realism? Modes of reading in Marxist-socialist and post-Marxist-socialist Television drama criticism

Chapter:
(p.9) 1 Beyond realism? Modes of reading in Marxist-socialist and post-Marxist-socialist Television drama criticism
Source:
Beyond Representation
Author(s):

Geraldine Harris

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9780719074585.003.0010

This chapter summarizes some well-rehearsed debates from the early to mid-twentieth century, concerning realism and naturalism in television drama and the impact on those debates of poststructuralist and postmodern theory. This lays the ground for a more complex discussion of the assumptions about form, subjectivity and identity, production and reception that were produced on the way. Such issues help identify limitations and problems within the postmodern, ‘post-Marxist’ approaches that often dominated television criticism in the 1990s. The relationship between politics and aesthetics was most often defined through reference to the Marxist-socialist tradition and more specifically to the work of theatre practitioner and theorist Bertolt Brecht. Brecht famously developed a critique of what he termed ‘Aristotelian’ or ‘dramatic theatre’, which he defined as offering an illusion of reality that conformed to the ideology of the parasitic bourgeoisie. Usually understood as an attack on naturalism and/or realism, Brecht's analysis of this aesthetic embraced all aspects of production including illusionist staging, linear narratives, psychologically motivated characterisation and naturalistic acting.

Keywords:   post Marxist, post socialist, Bertolt Brecht, British television, poststructuralist theory, postmodern theory, Aristotelian theatre, parasitic bourgeoisie

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