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The Blair SupremacyA study in the politics of Labour's party management$
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Lewis Minkin

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780719073793

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: September 2014

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9780719073793.001.0001

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Distrust, management and the long road to Iraq

Distrust, management and the long road to Iraq

Chapter:
(p.503) 16 Distrust, management and the long road to Iraq
Source:
The Blair Supremacy
Author(s):

Lewis Minkin

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9780719073793.003.0017

In practice, as illustrated here and in Chapter 15, behind ‘the end of control freakery’, management, was unchanged in process and method. It also became bolder and more clearly defensive of Blair against Brown. There was increasing union distrust of Blair’s direction of travel and of his leadership behaviour Yet, as shown, the resentful unions came up with a major financial support in 2002 to assist the party without financial pressure on policy. This apparently puzzling conjunction is closely examined. Growing distrust of Blair’s management and managers by the unions was paralleled by a deepening public ethos of anti-manipulative distrust of politicians, especially Blair. That feature is given detailed investigation. Leader and management found it difficult to improve their adverse party and public reputation for manipulation, especially as both realism and managerial success after 2001 pointed them towards benefits in continuing their behaviour, as did the new delivery pressures from the strong Leader. Managerial successes continued; crucially, the voice of the wider Labour Party over Iraq was systematically restricted and distorted by the management. .

Keywords:   Extra union finance secured without policy conditions, Anti-manipulative ethos, Realism and managerial success, Strong Leader, Iraq restriction and distortion of party voice

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