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The Bush Administration, Sex and the Moral Agenda$
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Edward Ashbee

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780719072765

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: July 2012

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9780719072765.001.0001

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The politics of ‘W-ism’

The politics of ‘W-ism’

Chapter:
(p.47) 2 The politics of ‘W-ism’
Source:
The Bush Administration, Sex and the Moral Agenda
Author(s):

Ashbee Edward

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9780719072765.003.0003

This chapter considers the development of George W. Bush's thinking, the ways in which it has been shaped by the need to capture the votes of those with moderate attitudes and the electoral strategies that flow from this. It suggests that, while faith undoubtedly played a role in moulding Bush's public image, the character of his electoral strategy, the nature of the domestic policy initiatives pursued by the administration and the president's approach to moral and cultural issues were shaped by other processes. In particular, ‘W-ism’ was informed and structured by events and developments during the latter half of the 1990s. It was based on close reading of public opinion, particularly of those groupings and constituencies that were pivotal to election victory.

Keywords:   George W. Bush, electoral strategies, faith, public image, W-ism, domestic policy, moral issues, cultural issues, public opinion

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