Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Cinema of Alex de la Iglesia$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Peter Buse, Nuria Triana-Toribio, and Andrew Willis

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780719071362

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: July 2012

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9780719071362.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM MANCHESTER SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.manchester.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Manchester University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MSO for personal use (for details see http://www.manchester.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 21 January 2018

Crimen ferpecto (2004): the mise-en-scène of mise-en-scène

Crimen ferpecto (2004): the mise-en-scène of mise-en-scène

Chapter:
(p.161) 7 Crimen ferpecto (2004): the mise-en-scène of mise-en-scène
Source:
The Cinema of Alex de la Iglesia
Author(s):

Peter Buse

Núria Triana Toribio

Andy Willis

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9780719071362.003.0033

Crimen Ferpecto, Álex de la Iglesia's seventh feature film as director and second as a producer with Pánico, was released in October 2004. It returns to the black comedy of El día de la bestia, Muertos de risa and La comunidad, and, in many ways, is a compendium of the earlier films, with its sudden violence, explicit and exaggerated misogyny, and vicious and none-too-innocent children. In addition, the film recycles images and motifs from the earlier films. This is a cinema that pulls against the ‘ontology of the photographic image’ identified by André Bazin. According to Bazin, the cinema has a privileged relation to the real, and ‘enjoys a certain advantage in virtue of this transference of reality from the thing to its reproduction’.

Keywords:   Crimen Ferpecto, André Bazin, black comedy, ontology, photographic image, misogyny

Manchester Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.