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A War of IndividualsBloomsbury Attitudes to the Great War$
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Jonathan Atkin

Print publication date: 2002

Print ISBN-13: 9780719060700

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: July 2012

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9780719060700.001.0001

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Introduction

Introduction

Chapter:
(p.1) Introduction
Source:
A War of Individuals
Author(s):

Jonathan Atkin

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9780719060700.003.0001

The Great War of 1914–1918 was the first ‘modern’ war, involving more spheres of human experience than perhaps any previous conflict. Whole populations were caught up in it and exhibited myriad shades of reaction to it – including, naturally, opposition. This book concentrates on those individualistic British citizens whose motivation for opposition in thought or deed was grounded upon moral, humanistic or aesthetic precepts. In his Pacifism in Britain 1914–1945: The Defining of a Faith, the historian Martin Ceadel singles out what he terms ‘humanitarian pacifism’ as a valid form of anti-war feeling, stating that it is ‘no less a dogma’ than religious or political pacifism. The years of the Great War were the formative ones that helped to mould the Bloomsbury Group into the image which would be recast by the public imagination in succeeding generations. This book explores both the past itself and the personalities of bohemian Bloomsbury, from Bertrand Russell and Ottoline Morrell to Siegfried Sassoon, Wilfred Owen, Paul Nash, Ivor Gurney, Mabel St Clair Stobart, Virginia Woolf and Lytton Strachey.

Keywords:   Great War, humanitarian pacifism, anti-war feeling, Bloomsbury Group, Bertrand Russell, Siegfried Sassoon, Wilfred Owen, Paul Nash, Ivor Gurney, Virginia Woolf

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