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The Other EmpireMetropolis, India and Progress in the Colonial Imagination$
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John Marriott

Print publication date: 2003

Print ISBN-13: 9780719060182

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: July 2012

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9780719060182.001.0001

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The antinomies of progress

The antinomies of progress

Chapter:
(p.9) Chapter One The antinomies of progress
Source:
The Other Empire
Author(s):

John Marriott

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9780719060182.003.0002

This chapter focuses on metropolitan poor and colonial peoples, which are often considered as one of the most threatening antitheses to progress. The writings of travellers and evangelicals were by far the most influential and provided the clearest evidence of a concern—realized in practical action—that embraced the plight of slaves and the poor. In terms of their chronologies, rhetoric, narratives and agencies, there were distinct homologies between the discursive appropriations of the antithesis of progress during the long nineteenth century. Agents operating across narrowly defined boundaries using an intellectual and linguistic repertoire forged from the transformation in human consciousness conceptualized imperial progress on the fronts of slavery, poverty and colonialism. Furthermore, the chapter explores the rise of the idea of progress and how it structured British thought on the place of non-European peoples in the new world order.

Keywords:   nineteenth century, imperial rule, non-European peoples, antithesis of progress, human consciousness, conceptualized imperial progress, slavery

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