Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Equal Subjects, Unequal RightsIndigenous People in British Settler Colonies, 1830-1910$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Julie Evans, Patricia Grimshaw, and David Phillips

Print publication date: 2003

Print ISBN-13: 9780719060038

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: July 2012

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9780719060038.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM MANCHESTER SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.manchester.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Manchester University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MSO for personal use (for details see http://www.manchester.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 23 November 2017

South Africa: saving the White voters from being ‘utterly swamped’

South Africa: saving the White voters from being ‘utterly swamped’

Chapter:
(p.157) Chapter Seven South Africa: saving the White voters from being ‘utterly swamped’
Source:
Equal Subjects, Unequal Rights
Author(s):

Julie Evans

Patricia Grimshaw

David Philips

Shurlee Swain

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9780719060038.003.0008

This chapter focuses on the voting rights and political outcomes of the intensified appropriation of Indigenous lands by British settler colonists in South Africa from the 1870s to 1910. By the 1870s, important economic and political developments in South Africa prompted Britain to act in consolidating its interests throughout the Southern African region. These developments, which included the ‘mineral revolution’ through the discovery of diamond fields and gold fields, and Lord Carnarvon's federation scheme of 1870, together reshaped the political geography of South Africa within three decades. By the end of the nineteenth century, the separate African polities had almost entirely disappeared under some form of European colonial jurisdiction, and Britain was also directly threatening the independence of the two Boer republics. The chapter summarizes the political developments related to the voting rights of people, including settlers and Indigenous in the British settler colonies of Natal and Cape Colony.

Keywords:   British settler colonists, Natal, South Africa, Cape Colony, Lord Carnarvon, voting rights, Boer republics, mineral revolution, political geography, political developments

Manchester Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.