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Equal Subjects, Unequal RightsIndigenous People in British Settler Colonies, 1830-1910$
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Julie Evans, Patricia Grimshaw, and David Phillips

Print publication date: 2003

Print ISBN-13: 9780719060038

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: July 2012

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9780719060038.001.0001

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Australasia: one or two ‘honorable cannibals’ in the House?

Australasia: one or two ‘honorable cannibals’ in the House?

Chapter:
(p.63) Chapter Three Australasia: one or two ‘honorable cannibals’ in the House?
Source:
Equal Subjects, Unequal Rights
Author(s):

Julie Evans

Patricia Grimshaw

David Philips

Shurlee Swain

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9780719060038.003.0004

This chapter focuses on the expansion of the British Empire and early political developments in the British settler colonies in the region of Australasia from the late 1830s to around 1870. The first colonies on the Australian continent and the islands of New Zealand in the decades from the late 1830s to 1870 were notable for their swift movement politically from initial Crown colonies to virtual local self-government. The British Government first made arrangements for representative government based on a property franchise for all of these colonies, and then conceded responsible government to the settler colonists. Further, by 1860, the legislatures of the eastern and southeastern Australian colonies had instituted full manhood suffrage. The Indigenous peoples of the Australasian colonies, Aborigines and Maori, were included in this process to self-government and democracy. The means by which colonists could acquire land and their subsequent usage of it would strongly influence Maori and Aborigines' entitlement to political citizenship and the likelihood of their exercising it.

Keywords:   settler colonies, British Empire, Australasia, Aborigines, Maori, representative government, political citizenship, Crown colonies

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