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Half the BattleCivilian Morale in Britain During the Second World War$
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Robert Mackay

Print publication date: 2003

Print ISBN-13: 9780719058936

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: July 2012

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9780719058936.001.0001

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Introduction

Introduction

Chapter:
(p.1) Introduction
Source:
Half the Battle
Author(s):

Robert Mackay

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9780719058936.003.0001

This book reflects how extensive the ‘negative’ features were, that is, to what extent they could be held to be typical of the people as a whole. It then reviews the totality of the civilian experience: the strains and stresses to which total war subjected the civilian population and the range and extent of its reactions to them. Next, it determines the factors that shaped or influenced the morale of the people. The reports of Home Intelligence and Mass-Observation have an important feature in common: they are explicitly concerned with civilian morale, unlike the other sources, where this matter occurs incidentally or unwittingly. They helped to show that pessimism to have been for the most part mistaken.

Keywords:   civilian morale, civilian, Home Intelligence, Mass-Observation, strains, stresses

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