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Women drinking out in Britain since the early twentieth century$
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David W. Gutzke

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780719052644

Published to Manchester Scholarship Online: May 2015

DOI: 10.7228/manchester/9780719052644.001.0001

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Conclusion

Conclusion

Chapter:
(p.277) Conclusion
Source:
Women drinking out in Britain since the early twentieth century
Author(s):

David W. Gutzke

Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:10.7228/manchester/9780719052644.003.0013

In over a century of drinking out, women’s consumption habits varied considerably. It was in the last quarter of the twentieth century, however, that they were revolutionized, creating an entirely new subculture of drinking. Economic, demographic and marketing developments all contributed to changing how women drank. Legislation outlawing men-only bars in 1976 facilitated the emergence of women’s drinking habits. So did Thatcher’s Beer Orders. Advertising, wine bars, pubcos, and entrepreneurs outside the brewing industry (notably Tim Martin and Crispin Tweddle) who espoused corporate social responsibility and embraced feminine-friendly drinking venues, all contributed to a new culture of drinking.

Keywords:   Moral panics, Entry of respectable women into drink premises, Progressivism, Sydney O. Nevile, Domestic drinking, Leading beverages, Female-friendly venues, Male escorts, Environmental psychology, Deindustrialization

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